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Captain William M. Morgan of Batavia New York.

A Husband to Lucinda Pendleton Morgan, and Father of two small children,

Lucinda Wesley Morgan and Thomas Jefferson Morgan.

Morgan had practiced the craft of Free-masonry for over 30 years,

Morgan searved under the command of Freemason Andrew Jackson, 

fought the British in the War of 1812.

Reverend Charles Finney in his book published 1869,

THE CHARACTER, CLAIMS AND

PRACTICAL WORKINGS OF FREEMASONRY

writes of Morgan’s opinion of Freemasonry:

“He regarded it as highly injurious to the cause of Christ,

and as eminently dangerous to the government of our country.”

 

Morgan was kidnapped 9/11/1826 by Masons for

writing: Illustrations of Masonry, He was taken North, and Later

murdered by Freemason Henry L. Valance who

drowned Morgan in the Niagara River.

Valance had two other Mason brothers help him with this act.

This murder led to a great revival in Christian churches as many

Masons left the Masonry after this event became publicly known.

The public shame of this murder forced many Freemasons

to admit the sin of slavery that they had chained themselves to.

 

KJV Psa 118:22 The stone [which] the builders refused

is become the head [stone] of the corner.

 

Rejecting the Masonic Worshipful Masters, and

Repenting, they Accepted God the Father, Son (Jesus Christ)

and Holy Ghost as Their Single Master.

 

 

KJV John 08:12 Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying,

I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness,

but shall have the light of life.

 

A great effort involving many masons to keep the death of Morgan

from meeting public justice caused many to join the Anti-Masonic Political Party.

 

On October 7, 1827, a body was found on the beach of Lake Ontario.

A coroner's inquest was held on October 17, 1827. The report states

that "beyond any shadow of a doubt" the body was that of Capt.

William Morgan. It further states that "he came to his death by

suffocation by drowning."

 

In 1882 a large monument to Morgan was placed in

the Batavia City Cemetery. On four faces it reads:

Morgan

 

SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF

            W.M. Morgan,

   A NATIVE OF VIRGINIA,

 A CAPT IN THE WAR OF 1812.

A RESPECTABLE CITIZEN OF

   BATAVIA AND A MARTR

TO THE FREEDOM OF WRITING

PRINTING AND SPEAKING THE

TRUTH.      HE WAS ABDUCTED

FROM NEAR THIS SPOT IN THE

YEAR 1826. BY FREEMASONS

AND MURDERED FOR REVEALING

THE SECRETS OF THEIR ORDER.

 

"The bane of our Civil Institutions

is to be found in masonry,

already powerful and daily becoming more so.

I owe to my country an exposure of its dangers."

Captain William Morgan

 

Erected by volunteer contributions

from over 2000 persons residing

in Canada, Ontario and 26 of

the US and territories.

 

     THE COURT RECORDS OF

           GENESEE COUNTY,

          AND FILES OF THE

        BATAVIA ADVOCATE.

    KEPT IN THE RECORDER'S

OFFICE CONTAIN THE HISTORY

OF THE EVENTS THAT CAUSED

     THE ERECTION OF THIS

                MONUMENT

 

 

 

Below is a excerpt from chapter two of , THE CHARACTER, CLAIMS AND

PRACTICAL WORKINGS OF FREEMASONRY

 

"CONFESSION. 

"THE MURDER OF WILLIAM MORGAN, CONFESSED BY THE MAN WHO,

WITH HIS OWN HANDS, PUSHED HIM OUT OF THE BOAT INTO NIAGARA RIVER!

 "The following account of that tragical scene is taken from a pamphlet entitled,

'Confession of the murder of William Morgan, as taken down by Dr. John L. Emery,

of Racine County, Wisconsin, in the summer of 1848, and now (1849) first given to the public:'

"This 'Confession' was taken down as related by Henry L. Valance,

who acknowledges himself to have been one of the three who were selected to make a final

disposition of the ill-fated victim of masonic vengeance. This confession it seems was made

to his physicians, and in view of his approaching dissolution, and published after his decease.

"After committing that horrid deed he was as might well be expected, an unhappy man, by day

and by night. He was much like Cain--'a fugitive and a vagabond.' To use his own words,

'Go where I would, or do what I would, it was impossible for me to throw off the

consciousness of crime. If the mark of Cain was not upon me, the curse of the first murderer

was--the blood-stain was upon my hands and could not be washed out.

'He therefore commences his confession thus:--'My last hour is approaching; and as the

things of this world fade from my mental sight, I feel the necessity of making, as far as

 in my power lies, that atonement which every violator of the great law of right owes to

his fellow men' In this violation of law, he says, 'I allude to the abduction and murder of

the ill-fated William Morgan.'

"He proceeds with an interesting narrative of the proceedings of the fraternity in reference

to Morgan, while he was incarcerated in the magazine of Fort Niagara. I have room for a

few extracts only, showing the final disposition of their alleged criminal. Many consultations

were held, 'many plans proposed and discussed, and rejected.' At length being driven to the

necessity of doing something immediately for fear of being exposed, it was resolved in a

council of eight, that he must die: must be consigned to a 'confinement from which there is

 no possibility of escape--THE GRAVE.' Three of their number were to be selected by

ballot to execute the deed. 'Eight pieces of paper were procured, five of which were to remain

blank, while the letter D was written on the others. These pieces of paper were placed in a

large box, from which each man was to draw one at the same moment. After drawing we were

all to separate, without looking at the paper that each held in his hand. So soon as we had

arrived at certain distances from the place of rendezvous, the tickets were to be examined,

and those who held blanks. were to return instantly to their homes; and those who should

hold marked tickets were to proceed to the fort at midnight, and there put Morgan to death,

in such a manner as should seem to themselves most fitting.' Mr. Yalance was one of the

three who drew the ballots on which was the signal letter. He returned to the fort, where

he was joined by his two companions, who had drawn the death tickets. Arrangements

were made immediately for executing the sentence passed upon their prisoner, which was

to sink him in the river with weights; in hope, says Mr. Valance, 'that he and our crime

alike would thus be buried beneath the waves.' His part was to proceed to the magazine

where Morgan was confined, and announce to him his fate--theirs was to procure a boat

and weights with which to sink him. Morgan, on being informed of their proceedings against

him, demanded by what authority they had condemned him, and who were his judges.

'He commenced wringing his hands, and talking of his wife and children, the recollections

of whom, in that awful hour, terribly affected him. His wife, he said, was young and

inexperienced, and his children were but infants; what would become of them were he cut off;

and they even ignorant of his fate?' What husband and father would not be 'terribly affected'

under such circumstances--to be cut off from among the living in this inhuman manner?

"Mr. V.'s comrades returned. and informed him that they had procured the boat and weights,

and that all things were in readiness on their part. Morgan was told that all his

remonstrances were idle, that die he must, and that soon, even before the morning light.

The feelings of the husband and father were still strong within him, and he continued to

plead on behalf of his family. They gave him one half hour to prepare for his 'inevitable fate.'

They retired from the magazine and left him. "How Morgan passed that time,' says

Mr. Valance, 'I cannot tell, but everything was quiet as the tomb within.' At the expiration

of the allotted time, they entered the magazine, laid hold of their victim, 'bound his hands

behind him, and placed a gag in his mouth.' They then led him forth to execution. 'A short time,'

says this murderer, 'brought us to the boat, and we all entered it--Morgan being placed in the

bow with myself, along side of him. My comrades took the oars, and the boat was rapidly forced

out into the river. The night was pitch dark, we could scarcely see a yard before us and therefore

was the time admirably adapted to our hellish purpose.' Having reached a proper distance

from the shore, the oarsmen ceased their labors. The weights were all secured together by

a strong cord, and another cord of equal strength, and of several yards in length, proceeded

 from that. 'This cord,' says Mr. V., 'I took in my hand [did not that hand tremble ?] and fastened

 it around the body of Morgan, just above his hips, using all my skill to make it fast, so that it

would hold. Then, in a whisper, I bade the unhappy man to stand up, and after a momentary

hesitation he complied with my order. He stood close to the head of the boat, and there was

just length enough of rope from his person to the weights to prevent any strain, while he was

standing. I then requested one of my associates to assist me in lifting the weights from the

bottom to the side of the boat, while the others steadied her from the stern. This was done,

and, as Morgan was standing with his back toward me, I approached him, and gave him a

strong push with both my hands, which were placed on the middle of his back. He fell forward,

carrying the weights with him, and the waters closed over the mass. We remained quiet for

two or three minutes, when my companions, without saying a word, resumed their places,

and rowed the boat to the place from which they had taken it.'"

 

They also kidnapped Mr. Miller, the publisher; but the citizens of Batavia, finding it out,

pursued the kidnappers, and finally rescued him.

 

The courts of justice found themselves entirely unable to make any headway

against the wide-spread conspiracy that was formed among Masons in respect to this matter.

These are matters of record. It was found that they could do nothing with the courts,

with the sheriffs, with the witnesses, or with the jurors; and all their efforts were for a

time entirely impotent Indeed, they never were able to prove the murder of Morgan,

and bring it home to the individuals who perpetrated it.

 

But Mr. Morgan had published Freemasonry to the world.

The greatest pains were taken by Masons to cover up the transaction,

and as far as possible to deceive the public in regard to the fact that Mr. Morgan

had published Masonry as it really is.

 

Masons themselves, as is affirmed by the very best authority, published two spurious

editions of Morgan's book, and circulated them as the true edition which Morgan had published.

These editions were designed to deceive Masons who had never seen Morgan's edition,

and thus to enable them to say that it was not a true revelation of Masonry.